Category Archives: Politics

‘Women’ issues

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I met a potential producer-cum-director recently. Who thought the ultimate manner in which to interest me for his project was to say it is a woman-centric project.

“Really,” I say. “What is the subject?”

“Woman-centric,” he says emphatically.

“But which woman-centric subject are you exactly referring to,” I further prod.

“Please read this madam,” he says and hands me am A-4 size paper.

The woman is bold, and centre of this movie.” It says. “She is mother nature, the mother and all other roles wrapped into one. She is a strong woman and will be lead in this film.” And similar other platitudes.

So I hand the paper back and go back to what I was originally saying. “I am not really a film person and won’t be able to help you.”

” But madam, it is woman-oriented,” he plaintively exclaims.

“But you are not telling which women’s issue..” , I say.

“You may steal my story so I cannot tell you the story,” he says. That I understand, up to a point.

“Well.. it’s about rape, hunger, motherhood and poverty.. it’s a ground-breaking film.. with a strong woman character..” he adds.

“That really says nothing..” I say, trying to end this futile conversation..

He lets it go.. starts talking possible cast. I am suggesting women who I think can play strong characters.. Nandita Das?

“No Madam, she is old now. How will I sell my movie if she is in it?” His reply.

My expression tells him it’s the wrong reply.

“It will be a festival film, no? We won’t be able to afford her plus she already has Bawandar.”, he backtracks.

My eyes have glazed over. I now get what most of film maker friends say when they say that the real film industry has to still catch up with the rest of the world.

Remember when

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I am a Bhopali.

I met someone a few months ago who had just recently joined Dow Chemicals as an employee at the BKC Office in Mumbai. My first reaction was a Bhopal Gas Tragedy.

She actually turned around and said, “You know until I joined this place, I had no idea about this incident. Even now, only when the protests happen, I  realise it’s a big thing.”

So, people, there are other people out there who have forgotten or don’t have a clue about it (how is that even possible merits another discussion)

Remember them. The Victims. The Injustice. Remember that help is still to find it’s way to this place.

Like I read somewhere on Twitter, 1984 was quite the year for events that shaped the course of things in the years to come.

While you are remembering, it’s worth reading this book too.

You gotta have faith

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Books I have read recently have only convinced me how faith is what you derive out of any particular word, book or symbol. Anything can give you faith and it has absolutely nothing to do with religion. It can have  signs, it can be rituals, it can be meditation or it can be gazing into a big tomb of a book.

If you have faith, it doesn’t matter where it helps you from. Which also means the books really had nothing to do with it. It’s how I chose to interpret what I read. Since books forms such an important part of my life, it made complete sense that cementing of faith had to come from a combination of them.

I’ve read a varied series in the last few months and each one left me awed —  for all different reasons.

book cover_EGThe first was – Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert. This book had taken the world by storm and in my experience, most such books can be full of hokum.

While this book talks about one journey one woman makes, it doesn’t necessarily have translate into a lifestyle solution, ‘now available on the shelf’, for the reader. Which is what I think the book aimed for.

The book starts off well (but I have a sneaking feeling I loved the beginning only because the gastronomic treat the first section is). It’s very easily divided. Italy, the first part of her journey, where she lives for a few months to learn to speak the language better. Pray, when she comes to India to discover herself  (I know!) and Love, when she lives in Indonesia with a healer for a focus that seemed blurred.

It’s only when you reach Pray section, the second phase, you realise her epiphany-laden journey  may or may not continue in the same vein, for you, the reader. This part is based in India and I had to fight against my innate objections of India being typecast as a place to come and ‘discover your true being’. Thankfully the book does not classify the whole of India but only that ashram, as the very place to achieve oneness.

At this point in the book I remember thinking it takes very little to go from a non-believer to a believer. She thinks she knows what she wants and yet her body tells her of other things she needs.  It’s a painful time for her. But it’s faith that keeps her going. Not faith in any one person or one philosophy. Just faith that she needs to get from one point to another.

It told me how a path of ‘getting better’ does not necessarily mean improvement or ease of method. It was like something made complete sense after that. It did not mean I need to go into an ashram but it meant believe in what you want, your actions will reflect what you believe in, therefore a self-fulling prophecy.

The third part in Indonesia was the blurriest to me. It spoke about love. It spoke about generic love and spoke about the need for love and for some reason, there was no resonance. It ends just like it starts, with no apparent focus. But that’s the best part. The open-endedness of the whole journey. Allowing any reader to go on it, and come away with what you are seeking.

book cover_BBThe second book to partially alter my thinking stream was Bill Bryson’s A short History of Nearly Everything. (As an aside, this is how textbooks should be written).

It’s a book  that, among other things, makes you aware of your scale. How big or small or important or insignificant you are.

How are there are *so* many things you still have no clue about and how there are stranger phenomenons that have to happen to convince you of your reason to be.

Last few days, even weeks,  I have been going through a faith upheaval as it were. Nothing I say or thought matched my actions. And I wondered what was teaching me a lesson.

I lamented the lack of an obvious focus and need to prove myself. Like I heard in a bad movie some days ago, I stopped betting on myself. Suddenly, after an argument yesterday, it became clear. I had vaguely formed my milestones but that argument cemented it. It was the change faith had shown me but I was refusing to accept it.

Now how I reach the other end of the milestone is another matter altogether. But that’s where a third, unrelated book comes in. The third book was the Book of Ram by Devdutt Patnaik. I was reading the book in continuum to understand Sita better but did get a different takeaway.

The books says: “According to AdhyatmaRamayana, Ravan is our ego, that part of us that is constantly seeking external validation. Having submitted to adharma, our ego has abducted Sita, our mind. That is why we constantly seek to dominate the world around us and that is why we do not accept it for what it is.

We have to rescue Sita. We have to unleash the power of Hanuman, our intellect, cross the sea of life, overpower Ravan, burn his golden Lanka and reunite Sita and Ram, who await discovery within us.”

This emphatic conclusion of the book is reminscent of that one powerful line from one song of Swades:

मन से  रावण  जो  निकाले, राम उसके मन में है.

We should always pay heed to the other side.

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An interesting speech to read in these times of the Jinnah Controversy.

I think we should keep that in front of us as our ideal and you will find that in course of time Hindus would cease to be Hindus and Muslims would cease to be Muslims, not in the religious sense, because that is the personal faith of each individual, but in the political sense as citizens of the State.